Albert North Veterinary Clinic

216 McIntyre Street
Regina, SK S4R 2L8

(306)545-7211

albertnorthvetclinic.ca

Albert North Veterinary Clinic - Vaccinations

 We offer a special vaccination compliance discount applied to your subsequent exam fees after your pet's initial vaccination.  Call for details!

Puppies and kittens are born with a very limited immune system. Immediately after birth most will receive some temporary immunity to viruses and bacteria from their mother's milk. This immunity will last for 6 to 14 weeks before it wanes and the puppy's or kitten's immune system needs to take over.  In order to provide your pet with protection from a number of serious and potentially fatal diseases, we recommend beginning vaccinations at 6 to 8 weeks of age. Booster or repeat vaccinations will be required to ensure their immune system has responded to the vaccinations and produced a lasting immune response.

We vaccinate for a number of different diseases. We feel very strongly that all puppies and kittens should receive these vaccinations as many of these diseases are quite common and easily preventable with appropriate vaccination.  

Adult vaccination schedules are determined by a discussion between you and the veterinarian about the lifestyle of your pet and then making a decision about what vaccines are required.  An annual health examination is recommended for every pet regardless of whether vaccinations are required or not. 

We recommend regular check ups: at least once yearly to ensure your pet stays healthy. In between veterinary visits it is a good idea to get in the habit of examining your pet at least once weekly to identify any potential problems early. Be sure to look in the mouth, check the eyes and ears for any redness or discharge, and check the skin for any sores or rashes. Please call if you notice anything unusual. Examining your pet on a regular basis at home will also make it less stressful for your pet during their visit to the vet.

 

Please note that weigh-ins and body condition scoring by a vet or technician is available whenever we are open, at no charge.  Regular weigh-ins can help you keep your pet at an optimal weight for good health as well as reduce stress for your pet by having quick, friendly visits to our office.

 

Below is more information, specific to dogs and cats:

 

Dogs:

Canine Distemper Virus: This is a potentially fatal disease of dogs, wild cats, ferrets and a variety of other wild animals. Unfortunately, it is  relatively common in unvaccinated dogs around Saskatchewan. Affected dogs will typically develop runny eyes, nose, a cough which often progresses into pneumonia and vomiting & diarrhea. If a dog survives the initial bout of Distemper it may develop fatal seizures three to six weeks after the initial infection. In adult dogs Distemper is fatal in about 50% of the cases; in young puppies the fatality rate is about 80%. There is no cure for Distemper; animals that are affected can only be offered supportive care. The virus is transmitted by direct contact with an affected animal, airborne transmission through coughing, and transmission on hands and clothes when people touch an infected animal and then go and touch a healthy one. Fortunately the vaccine is very effective at preventing Distemper.

 

Canine Parvoviral Enteritis (Parvo): This is a very common viral disease of dogs. We see several cases every month which is very unfortunate because this disease is easily prevented by vaccination. Parvo causes severe vomiting and diarrhea in affected individuals. If left untreated 80% of all cases will die. If treated with supportive care in the hospital about 80% will survive. Treatment is costly as the pup may need to spend a week or more in the hospital. Parvo is transmitted by contact with an infected dog?s feces or vomit. The virus is very hardy and can survive up to two years or more in the environment. It may also be passed on peoples? hands, clothes and shoes to other dogs, so even dogs that never leave your home can become infected.  The vaccine is very effective at preventing this disease.  However, as a puppy?s immunity to this virus is not complete until the final vaccination, we recommend keeping your pup out of high traffic dog areas (the park, pet stores etc) until the vaccine series is complete.

 

Adenovirus/Parainfluenza: Fortunately these viruses are less common but both have been reported in the Regina area. They cause viral bronchitis and possibly hepatitis in older dogs. In puppies they can cause a fatal pneumonia. This vaccine is also very effective against these diseases.

 

Bordetella: This is a bacteria that is responsible for most cases of Kennel Cough or infectious bronchitis in dogs. This is a very common disease. In most cases Kennel Cough infection will result in runny eyes, nose and a persistent cough that may last a few weeks and occasionally runny eyes & nose. The disease is rarely severe but may occasionally progress into pneumonia. Kennel Cough is treatable with antibiotics in severe cases (none are needed in mild cases), however we recommend trying to prevent it altogether! We recommend vaccination of any puppy that will be going to obedience classes, the groomer, the dog park or the boarding kennel. The vaccine works well in most cases to prevent the disease. Occasionally vaccinated dogs will develop Kennel Cough but it is much less severe than animals that have not been vaccinated.

 

Rabies: This virus causes a fatal encephalitis (brain swelling) in all mammals, including humans.  Rabies is spread through contact with infected saliva, usually through bite wounds. There is some evidence that airborne transmission from bat feces may be possible. The most common wild carriers of Rabies in Saskatchewan are bats, skunks, raccoons, foxes and coyotes. The vaccination is very effective and will protect not only your pet but also prevent your pet from spreading the disease to your family if s/he is bitten by an infected animal. Animals not vaccinated for rabies can be ordered into quarantine - to watch for symptoms or euthanized because testing for rabies can only be performed on the brain after death.

 

VACCINATION SCHEDULE FOR PUPPIES

8 weeks:

Distemper + Adenovirus 2 + Parainfluenza + Parvovirus (combination vaccine)

12 weeks:

Distemper + Adenovirus 2 + Parainfluenza + Parvovirus (combination vaccine) + Bordetella (optional, separate vaccine)

16 weeks:

Distemper + Adenovirus 2 + Parainfluenza + Parvovirus (combination) + 1 year Rabies (separate)

16 months:

Distemper + Adenovirus 2 + Parainfluenza + Parvovirus (combination) + Bordetella (optional, separate) + 3 year Rabies (separate)

 

At every vaccine appointment the veterinarian will do a complete physical examination on your puppy. The doctor will check his/her teeth, ears, eyes and listen to his/her heart and lungs. This is important to identify any health concerns that may appear as he/she grows and to ensure that your puppy is healthy enough to receive its vaccinations. At this time we will also be happy to discuss any concerns you may have regarding your puppy's health or development.  Above is an example of a typical vaccine series schedule. In some cases this may need to be altered depending on the health and age of your puppy or if your puppy is of a breed where we may need to separate out vaccinations further. Once your puppy has had its series of puppy vaccinations, the veterinarian will discuss the need for booster vaccinations in the upcoming years. A preventative health program will be tailored to your puppy's needs.

 

Cats:

 

Feline Panleukopenia: This disease; known as distemper; causes fever, inappetance, vomiting, diarrhea, depression and dehydration.  It is often fatal in young, unvaccinated kittens.  Treatment is supportive; unfortunately, affected kittens often die even with appropriate treatment.  The virus is passed by direct contact with infected animals and may be passed via transmission from contaminated hands or clothing.  The vaccine is very effective at preventing this disease.

 

Feline Upper Respiratory Viruses:  These viruses, such as FVR (Feline Viral Rhinotracheitis - a type of herpes virus) and FCV (Feline Calici virus) are seen here in Saskatchewan.  Both viruses cause sneezing, nasal discharge, conjunctivitis, coughing and may or may not include not eating, lethargy, dehydration and fever.  Treatment is supportive with antibiotics for secondary bacterial infections.  Treatment is not required unless they are lethargic and not eating.  FVR may stay in an infected cat's body for the rest of his/her life and become reactivated in times of stress.  Transmission is airborne and via direct contact - such as contaminated hands or clothing.

 

Rabies: This virus causes a fatal encephalitis (brain swelling) in all mammals, including humans.  Rabies is spread through contact with infected saliva, usually through bite wounds. There is some evidence that airborne transmission from bat feces may be possible. The most common wild carriers of Rabies in Saskatchewan are bats, skunks, raccoons, foxes and coyotes. The vaccination is very effective and will protect not only your pet but also prevent your pet from spreading the disease to your family if s/he is bitten by an infected animal. Animals not vaccinated for rabies can be ordered into quarantine to watch for symptoms or euthanized because testing for rabies can only be performed on the brain after death.

 

Feline Leukemia:  This virus causes cancers, anemias, fever, weight loss and immunosuppression.  There is no treatment for this virus.  It is strongly recommended to test for the virus in all cats new to a household.  Feline Leukemia is passed from mom cat to kitten, through bite wounds from an infected cat, sharing food & water dishes, or litter boxes over prolonged periods of time.  The vaccine is not 100% effective but is far superior to no vaccination in high risk cats.

 

Feline Leukemia/FIV (Feline Immunodeficiency Virus) Test

It is recommended to test all kittens (especially stray or farm kittens) for these 2 viruses, which are untreatable and shorten their lifespan.  It is a blood test that can be done in clinic with results the same day.   

     VACCINATION SCHEDULE FOR KITTENS

8 weeks: 

Viral Rhinotracheitis + Calicivirus + Panleukopenia (combination) 

12 weeks:

Viral Rhinotracheitis + Calicivirus + Panleukopenia (combination) + Feline Leukemia Virus (recommended for outdoor cat or multi-cat households, optional, separate)

16 weeks:

Viral Rhinotracheitis + Calicivirus + Panleukopenia+ Feline Leukemia Virus (recommended for outdoor cat or multi-cat households, optional, separate) + 1 year Rabies (separate)

16 months:

Viral Rhinotracheitis + Calicivirus + Panleukopenia+ Feline Leukemia Virus (recommended for outdoor cat or multi-cat households, optional, separate) + 3 year Rabies (separate)

 

At each visit, the veterinarian will give your kitten a general examination to make sure she is healthy.  The doctor will check her teeth, ears, eyes and listen to her heart and lungs.  This is important to identify any health concerns that may appear as he/she grows and to ensure that your kitten is healthy enough to receive its vaccinations.   At this point, it is your opportunity to ask any questions you may have about your new kitten.  Above is an example of a typical vaccine series schedule.  In some cases this may need to be altered depending on the health and age of your kitten. Once your kitten has had its series of kitten vaccinations, the veterinarian will discuss the need for booster vaccinations in the upcoming years. A preventative health program will be tailored to your kitten's needs.   

 SVMA guidelines do not allow Veterinary Clinics to advertise their prices.  For information on the cost of any of our services, please contact us

 

 

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